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Eating three rashers of bacon a day raises heart risk: Study

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Eating three rashers of bacon a day raises heart risk: Study

London [England], Sept. 10: Now on, think before consuming more than three rashers of bacon a day.

A study says that eating more than three rashers of bacon a day could raise the risk of dying from heart disease by almost a quarter, reports the Independent.

The review of several different investigations into the health effects of processed meat dating back to the 1970s concluded that eating more than 50 gram a day could increase the risk of dying from heart disease by 24 percent.

It also increases the risk of diabetes by 32 percent and the risk of dying from cancer by eight percent.

The research by the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, studied the dangers of eating red meat such as beef, veal, pork, lamb and mutton and processed varieties such as ham, sausages, bacon, frankfurters and salami.

It found that eating more than 100 grams of unprocessed meat a day also increases the risk of advanced prostate cancer and bowel cancer by 19 percent and 17 percent respectively, death from heart disease by 15 per cent and breast cancer by 11 percent.

The report said a reason for this could be that the practice of cooking meat at high temperatures results in the production of chemicals called heterocyclic amines, which are believed to increase the risk of cancer in humans.

Meanwhile, processed meats contain much more salt, nitrites and chemical additives that occur when the meat undergoes treatment to extend its shelf life such as curing, smoking or salting.

Professor Alicja Wolk, who led the study, said, "During recent decades, consumption of red meat has been increasing globally, especially in developing countries," adding, "At the same time, there has been growing evidence that high consumption of red meat, especially of processed meat, may be associated with an increased risk of several major chronic diseases."

"Overall it's plausible to conclude - taking into account the available scientific evidence - that high consumption of red meat and especially processed meat is associated with the increased risk of several major chronic diseases and preterm mortality," Wolk further said.

According to Wolk, the 5-6 percent global increase in meat consumption was largely due to the increased consumption of red meat in economically developing countries like China.

It comes after the World Health Organisation concluded in October last year that processed meat could cause cancer.

The body's International Agency for Research on Cancer reclassified the meats as "probably carcinogenic to humans". (ANI)


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